Becky Hilton special STRUT workshop (Mon Oct 6 - Fri Oct 17)

We've organised this 2 week workshop on the fly, to take advantage of a rare west coast visit by champion artist/ dancer/ teacher Becky Hilton!

There are still some places left if you want in... Partial enrolments are acceptable if you are only free for some sessions.

Get in touch to book in via 9321 4066 or  business@strutdance.org.au

THE WORKSHOP DETAILS:

Week 1: 6 - 10 Oct, Monday to Thursday at The Chapel Space at 117 Angove Street, North Perth. Becky will take STRUT Professional Class as normal 9-10:30am, followed by a short break with the workshop to follow from 11am-2pm. On the Friday there will be NO WORKSHOP, but Professional Class will be at King Street Arts Centre at the usual time (full-time workshops participants can attend at no extra cost).

Week 2: 13 - 17 Oct, Monday to Friday in Studio 3 at King Street Arts Centre. Becky will take STRUT Professional Class as normal 9-10:30am, followed by a short break with the workshop to follow from 11am-2pm.

 

And here's the low-down from Becky on what the workshop entails:

GENERATE MAINTAIN INSPECT TRANSFORM
 
The making of a dance has always been the result of a complex system of relations, information and desires.  Inside each choreographic frame, dancers freely contribute their hard won embodied understandings and experiential knowledges and, in this way, transform every creative process they participate in. Dancers often generate movement vocabularies, participate in the development of choreographic methodologies and assist in framing conceptual questions. So whose dance is it? What if we accept that authorship is not the exclusive domain of the choreographer? What if we recognise that making a dance is a determinedly social and inherently collaborative thing to do? What if decide that every dancer is the author of their own dance inside every proposed choreographic frame? Whose dance is it then?
 
In this workshop we’ll devise some choreographic experiments investigating the dynamic relationship between authorship and agency, process and product, collaboration and interpretation; we'll research and experience how these questions have informed some seminal/historic scores and practices; and we’ll collaborate on a kind of folk dance of us, now and frame up our findings in a series of guerrilla performances for our friends and neighbours.  
 
And we’ll do a lot of talking with each other, in pairs and in groups, about anything and everything that arises from these particular dancing experiences.